Jamaica Travel Guide

Jamaica FAQ

What do I need to do before travelling?

We suggest that all our customers review foreign office advice for Jamaica before travelling. Click here for the latest information from the foreign office.

What are the visa requirements?

British Nationals do not require a visa to enter Jamaica and are usually granted entry for a maximum of 90 days. The date by which you will need to leave Jamaica will be stamped in your passport – if you wish to extend your stay beyond this date, you will need to apply to the Jamaican Passport, Immigration and Citizenship Agency. Your passport should be valid for a minimum of six months after your date of entry into Jamaica.

What is the currency in Jamaica?

The official currency of Jamaica is the Jamaican Dollar. Shops frequented by tourists will often accept US Dollars, however shops run and frequented by Jamaicans usually won’t. 

Will I need to bring an adaptor?

Jamaica uses the same electrical outlets and plug types as the United States and Canada, therefore a USA or universal electrical adaptor will be required. 

What is the language in Jamaica?

The official language of Jamaica is English. 

Is Jamaica safe?

Although most visits to Jamaica are trouble free, crime levels are fairly high, particularly in the capital city of Kingston. Take care to safeguard your belongings and valuables, as the motive for most crime directed at tourists is likely to be theft. 

What is the cuisine like?

Jamaica is world-renowned for its signature dishes of jerk chicken and pork. Jerk constitutes a style of cooking in which meat is rubbed or marinated in a hot spice mixture known as Jamaican jerk spice, which can also be applied to beef, fish, shrimp, lamb, sausage or tofu. Other popular dishes in Jamaica include fried dumplings, Jamaican patties, curry goat and ackee and saltfish. 

What nightlife is available?

When the sun sets in Jamaica, the pulse of reggae fills the air and the vibrant nightlife takes hold. The cities offer a diverse range of nightclubs, bars and restaurants, while many of the beach bars also stay open late into the evening.

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